International Whistleblower & Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Information

International Whistleblower Rewards and Exposing International Illegal Bribe Schemes

by The Law Offices of Jason S. Coomer

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South America Bribes, Money Laundering, Fraud, and Market Manipulation Are The Targes of SEC and CFTC Bounty Actions Which Pay Large Financial Rewards to International Whistleblowers Who Anonymously Expose Signficant Illegal Conduct by International South America Bribe Whistleblower Lawyer and South America Bounty Action Lawyer Jason Coomer

The United States uses bounty actions to target illegal bribey schemes, money laundering, and market manipulation. More specifically, the SEC and CFTC use anonymous bounty actions to detect illegal bribes, market manipulation, and other illegal conduct in South America. Through CFTC and SEC bounty actions international whistleblowers can earn large financial rewards by anonymously exposing corruption, fraud, and other illegal conduct. These actions include violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). The FCPA prohibits bribery of foreign officials by U.S. companies and foreign companies listed on the U.S. securities exchange. The FCPA also requires such companies to maintain accurate books and records. If you are aware of a significant illegal bribery schemes or other illegal conduct, please feel free to contact South America Bribe Lawyer Jason Coomer via e-mail message or use our submission form about a potential South America Bounty Action. Please remember that Internation Whistleblowers can report illegal conduct anonymously through a South America Bounty Action Lawyer.

South America Bounty Actions Can Pay Large Financial Rewards to Anonymous Whistleblowers Through A South America Whistleblower Lawyer in the United States

Corporations that pay illegal kickbacks and bribes to government officials and former government officials in exchange for contracts including large building projects can be brought to justice and made to pay large penalties under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and whistleblowers that bring these corporations to justice may be able to collect large economic rewards under the Securities Exchange Act (SEC Whistleblower Bounty Actions) and the Commodity Exchange Act (CFTC Whisteblower Bounty Actions).

The Illegal Bribe Whistleblower or Illegal Kickback Whistleblower may be entitled to not only the amount of the illegal bribe or kickback, but the benefit of the illegal bribe or kickback. In cases where $100,000.00 bribe is made to obtain a $100 million building project, the Illegal Bribe Whistleblower or Illegal Kickback Whistleblower may be entitled to 10 to 30% of the $100,000,000.00 and the $100,000.00 translating into a $10 million to $30 million award.

The SEC and CFTC Are Using Bounty Actions to Detect Fraud, Market Manipulation, Illegal Bribes, and other Illegal Conduct in South America and in several othe Emerging Markets

With the advance of technology and the ability to communicate and transport goods throughout the World, the World is becoming a global international trading network of many nations. In developing new markets, large multinational corporations often become extremely competitive to the point where they will violate laws and ethics in the pursuit of advantages to obtain large profits. South America's economy is emerging as a strong new market where many large multinational corporations are attempting to obtain large contracts. As such, multinational energy corporations, multinational manufacturing corporations, multinational construction corporations,and many other large multinational corporations are competing to obtain large oil exploration contracts, large construction contracts, large pharmaceutical contracts, and large manufacturing contracts.

This fierce competition too often leads to large illegal kickbacks and contract bribes to government officials to obtain these contracts. In these cases large multinational corporations and their subsidiaries that are registered with the SEC can be held accountable for illegal actions that violate the FCPA. Further, the CFTC and SEC are using Bounty Actions to detect illegal conduct that impact the global economy.

South America Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Violations Can Be the Basis of SEC and CFTC Bounty Actions

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) applies to “issuers” (U.S. and foreign companies listed on U.S. securities exchanges and their employees); “domestic concerns,” which run the gamut of business entities organized under U.S. laws or with their principal place of business in the United States; the officers, directors, employees, and agents of those U.S. business entities (irrespective of nationality); U.S. citizens; U.S. resident aliens; “any person,” including all foreign persons, who commit an act in furtherance of a foreign bribe while in the United States, and U.S. businesses and nationals acting abroad. A Company must require all of its affiliated companies and all of their employees to comply with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

South America CFTC and SEC Bounty Actions Require Original Evidence of Illegal Conduct

Under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and SEC Whistleblower Incentive Program, whistleblowers with original and specialized knowledge and evidence of corporate bribes of government officials and illegal kickbacks to government agents are eligible to recover large economic awards. By gathering this evidence and going through a lawyer, these whistleblowers can protect their identity through the process and potentially collect large rewards of 10% to 30% of the monetary sanctions including disgorged funds. If you are aware of an illegal bribe or illegal kickback that was used to secure a large contract,please feel free to contact Multinational Corporation Illegal Kickback and Bribe Whistleblower Lawyer Jason Coomer via e-mail message or use our submission form about a potential SEC Whistleblower Incentive Program Action or other Whistleblower Bounty Action.

South America's Vast National Resources Impact the Global Commodities Market and Market Manipulation or Illegal Conduct in Commodities Trading Can Be the Basis for CFTC County Actions

South America relies heavily on the exporting of goods and natural resources. On an exchange rate basis Brazil (the seventh largest economy in the world and the largest in South America) leads the way in total amount of exports followed by Argentina and Chile. Key exports include oil and gas, raw materials, and agricultural products.

Many large multinational corporations are seeking to obtain large contracts in South America including large oil companies, engineering companies, construction companies, energy companies, pharmaceutical companies, energy companies, consultants, oil & gas exploration companies, telecom companies, manufacturing companies, aerospace companies, and defense contractors. Some of these multinational corporations are offering large bribes and illegal kickbacks in an attempt to secure these South American contracts.

South America Oil Bribes, Money Laundering, and Market Manipulation Can Be The Basis of CFTC and SEC Bounty Actions

Oil Companies that pay illegal kickbacks and bribes to South American government officials and former South American government officials in exchange for South American drilling contracts, Sudamérica pipeline contracts, Sudamérica oil leases, South American offshore drilling, South American mining contracts, and other South American large building projects can be brought to justice and made to pay large penalties under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The whistleblowers that bring these corporations to justice may be able to collect large economic rewards under the Securities Exchange Act (SEC Whistleblower Bounty Actions) and the Commodity Exchange Act (CFTC Whisteblower Bounty Actions).

The South American Oil Company Illegal Bribe Whistleblower or South American Petroleum Company Illegal Kickback Whistleblower may be entitled to not only the amount of the illegal bribe or kickback, but the benefit of the illegal bribe or kickback. In cases where $100,000.00 bribe is made to obtain a $900 million pipeline, the South American Petroleum Illegal Bribe Whistleblower or South American Oil Company Illegal Kickback Whistleblower may be entitled to 10 to 30% of the $900,000,000.00 and the $100,000.00 translating into a $90 million to $300 million award.

Information on SEC and DOJ Enforcement Actions

Below are press releases from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission SEC and Department of Justice regarding large bribe schemes and illegal kickbacks used in South America. These multinational corporate bribes in South America include Brazil and Argentina. In these cases we see that large multinational corporations are using bribes and kickbacks to government officials to secure large contracts. In these cases, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is able to impose large fines for FCPA violations. If similar fines are made as a result of a whistleblower action could result in large economic rewards to the whistleblower.

The SEC and Other Government Agencies Have Forced Siemens to Pay over $1.6 Billion for FCPA Violations

The SEC took action against Siemens for violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). This decade-long bribery scheme involved a $1 billion government contract to produce national identity cards for Argentine citizens. The SEC and U.S. Department of Justice previously forced Siemens to pay $1.6 billion to resolve the FCPA charges with the SEC, U.S. Department of Justice, and Office of the Prosecutor General in Munich.

The South America International Bribery Scheme involved Siemens paying more than $100 million in bribes to high-ranking government officials including former Argentine presidents and former cabinet members. The executives falsified documents including invoices and sham consulting contracts, and participated in meetings in the United States to negotiate the terms of bribe payments. They used U.S. bank accounts to pay some of the bribes.

The DOJ and SEC Fined Siemens and Three Subsidiaries to Pay $450 million for Illegal South America Bribes

The DOJ and SEC fined Siemens AG), a German corporation, and three of its subsidiaries force violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). , the Department of Justice and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced. The Agencies found that Siemens and its subsitiaries violated the anti-bribery and books and records. More specifically, Siemens Venezuela admitted it made corrupt payments of at least $18,782,965 to various Venezuelan officials. These payment included direct and indirect payments through purported business consultants. These illegal payments were made in exchange for favorable business treatment in connection with two major metropolitan mass transit projects called Metro Valencia and Metro Maracaibo. Some of those payments were made using U.S. bank accounts controlled by the purported business consultants.

Siemens paid $350 million in disgorgement of profits relating to those violations. Disgorgement profits are benefit of the bribe profits and can be sought by the SEC, CFTC, or DOJ

The SEC Fined TYCO For Accounting Fraud, Illegal Bribes, and Securities Violations

The U.S. Securities and Exchange found that Tyco inflated its operating income by at least $500 million through improper accounting practices. The agency also found that Tyco bribed Brazilian officials to obtain business. Thus, the agency found that Tyco violated the antibribery provisions and accounting provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

South American Government Official Bribe Whistleblower Lawyer, Brazil Government Agent Bribery Reward Lawyer, United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Whistleblower Reward Lawyer, US SEC Bribery Whistleblower Incentive Program Lawyer, & Illegal Bribe Bounty Action Lawyer

South America is a continent situated in the Western Hemisphere. The continent is also considered a subcontinent of the Americas. It includes twelve independent countries—Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela—and French Guiana, which is an overseas region of France. The South American countries that border the Caribbean Sea—Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana—are also known as Caribbean South America.

South America is also known as América del Sur, Sudamérica or Suramérica in Spanish; América do Sul in Portuguese; Zuid-Amerika in Dutch; and Amérique du Sud in French.

During the first decade of the 21st century, South American governments have elected socialist leaders in Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, Argentina, Ecuador, Bolivia, Paraguay, Peru and Venezuela. South America for the most part still embraces free market policies, and it is taking an active path toward greater continental integration. Additionally, South America has a strong intergovernmental entity that was formed which aims to merge the two existing customs unions: Mercosur and the Andean Community, thus forming the third-largest trade bloc in the world. This new political organization known as Union of South American Nations seeks to establish free movement of people, economic development, a common defense policy and the elimination of tariffs.

Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) Prohibitions

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) prohibits the offer or making of payments or giving anything of value, either directly or indirectly, to any foreign official, political party or political candidate, or public international organization to obtain or maintain business when the offer, payment or gift is intended to influence a desired action; induce an act in violation of a lawful duty; cause a person to refrain from acting in violation of a lawful duty; secure any improper advantage; or influence the decision of a government or instrumentality. These prohibitions preclude payments were unlawful under the laws of the country in which payment was made; payments that are not legitimate expenses directly related to the promotion, demonstration or explanation of the company’s product or services; and payments that are not made in accordance with a contract between the company and a foreign entity. These prohibitions also include third party actions where the company knows that a payment or a gift will be provided to a government official or agency for the purpose of obtaining a contract or business.

International South Amercia Bribe Lawyer Handles Interational Bribe Bounty Actions in South America

As an United States Multinational Corporation Illegal Bribe Whistleblower Bounty Lawyer and United States SEC Multinational Illegal Kickback Whistleblower Reward Lawyer, Jason S. Coomer commonly works with other powerful illegal international business contract bribe whistleblower lawyers and illegal contract kickback whistleblower lawyers to handle large South America Multinational Corporation Bribe Whistleblower Bounty Lawsuits.

If you are the original source with special knowledge of fraud and are interested in learning more about a South America Multinational Corporation illegal kickback lawsuit, Multinational Oil Corporation SEC violation Whistleblower Reward Lawsuit, Multinational Corporation South America FCPA violation Informant Reward Lawsuit, or other large contract bribe whistleblower recovery lawsuit, please feel free to contact South America Illegal Kickback and Bribery Whistleblower Reward Lawyer Jason Coomer via e-mail message or use our submission form about a potential South America Illegal Bribe United States SEC Whistleblower Incentive Program Action, South America Illegal Kickback Whistleblower Recovery Lawsuit, or other Whistleblower Bounty Action.

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